2021

Your Guide To Using Dental Implants In Conjunction With Braces

If you have a few things you want to improve about your smile or overall dental health, you may need to use multiple treatments to achieve your goals. If you're missing a tooth or have a tooth with an irregular appearance, dental implants are a top alternative. A dental implant consists of an artificial tooth that's attached to the jaw via a screw.  However, if you have crooked teeth or if your jaws aren't aligned properly, braces can remedy these issues.

Smoking And Dental Implants: What You Need To Know

Dental implants are a great way to restore missing or damaged teeth. If you smoke, you may wonder if you can go through dental implant surgery and if the implants will be a success. Although you can get dental implants as a smoker, you need to know how your habit can impact your procedure. You can still get implants if you smoke, but there are some things you need to know:

4 Most Important Things You Should Know About Dental Implants

If you are considering dental implants as a way of replacing your missing teeth, you may be worried about the procedure. It's okay to experience surgical anxiety. You might be imagining how your tooth roots will be replaced with metal. You might also be wondering how the screw-like posts will fit in your mouth. However, getting the right information is vital in abating fear. Here are four important things you need to know about dental implants:

4 Orthodontic Treatments For Teens And Adults

Tooth misalignment is a natural phenomenon. It's not uncommon for people to have crooked teeth or gaps in between their teeth. However, tooth and jaw misalignments may cause discomfort. Some people don't like the way their smiles look due to these features. Luckily, orthodontic treatment can help. If you're interested in straightening your teeth or correcting an overbite, you should schedule an appointment with an orthodontist. Here are four orthodontic treatments that can help teenagers and adults.

Cleidocranial Dysostosis And Your Child's Teeth: What Parents Need To Know

It's not particularly common for a child to be diagnosed with cleidocranial dysostosis, and the condition is only seen in approximately one out of a million people. The condition affects bone and dental development, and many people with cleidocranial dysostosis have poorly-developed collarbones, with the final closing of their skull (anterior fontanelle) often delayed, as opposed to happening during infancy. Abnormal dental development is a hallmark of the condition, and it's likely that your child will need various forms of dentistry to give them an appropriate level of dental functionality.